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Numberland

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Six

On to number 7

HAUF A DOZEN

My maw telt me tae buy:
hauf a dozen eggs,
a big bag o' tatties,
a loaf o' bread, an a tin o' beans,
an tae check ma change
an I wuid get sixpence.

Ma maw said tae mind
an see that the none o' the eggs
were cracked awready;
tae hurry back hame
tae ma mammy or I wuid
get six o' her best.

Well. I forgot the bread.
You'd forget your head if it wisnae
     screwed on.
I didnae look in at the eggs,
lift each wan gently, an check
its bottom. My maw's haund wis itchin.
Wan o' the eggs wis caved in,

smashed up like Humpty Dumpty.
Ave no got a guid memory.
I'm aye at sixes and sevens.
I'm scatty like a chicken.
An' till that day I didnae ken
that six wis hauf a dozen.

Jackie Kay

Good old SIX is the number you'll see
When you multiply one two and three
Now here's a good game:
Add them up - it's the same!
It's "perfect", I think you'll agree

A Stanton

Old testamentAccording to the Old Testament the world was created in 6 days (and on the seventh day God rested).

6 is a triangular number: 1 + 2 + 3 = 6

A cube has 6 faces. A cube is also called a hexahedron.

IronThe earth's crust is 6% iron.

A fathom is 6 feet deep.

The BBC broadcasts 6 pips at certain hours, 5 short pips then one long. The start of the long pip is the start of the hour.

The EarthThe world's population has recently passed 6 billion ( 6 ,000,000,000).

The Dead Sea has a salt content 6 times that of normal sea water.

The lowest perfect number is 6. This means it is equal to the sum of its divisors (6=1+2+3).