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Maths and money
It's in our pockets, it's down the back of the sofa, it's everywhere. Whether we're buying a pint of milk or sorting out rent or a mortgage it's part of everyday life for us and our children. Here are a few ideas that can help your children learn about money.
Pizza please!
Your pizza costs £3.60. Cut it into six equal slices. How much does each slice cost? The answer is that each slice costs 60p.
  • How much is half a slice?
  • How much do two slices cost?
  • How much does half (1/2) of the whole pizza cost? What if you cut your pizza into four equal slices (quarters)?
  • How much does one slice (1/4) cost now?
  • How much does half cost now? Is it the same, more or less than above?


    one slice gone...how many lefteating pizza
    ‘Supercalifrajalisticexpealidoutius'
    To get your children started let them count the letters in the word above.
  • How many letters has it got?
  • If the vowels cost 5p and the consonants cost 10p, how much would that be?
  • In the same way, how much is your child's name worth?
  • How many words can you write for one pound?
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      Money! Money! Money!
    Spread your change out on the table.
  • Find the biggest coin. Is it worth the most?
  • Find the smallest coin. Is it worth the least?
  • Put them in order of value.
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      Calculator costs
    Use your calculator to find the cost of:
  • one sweet.
    Clue 1. Enter the cost of the packet of sweets on the calculator display, for example 35(pence).
    2. Press the divide ÷ button.
    3. Count the number of sweets in the packet, and enter this number on the calculator, for example 42(sweets).
    4. Press the equals = button.
    5. The answer is 0.833(pence), which is less than 1p for each sweet.

    Now use your calculator to find the cost of:
  • one stick of chewing gum;
  • one finger of a chocolate bar;
  • one segment of a tangerine;
  • one mint; and so on.
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      Maths and money

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